Vending Machine Business Dealer

When choosing a vending machine dealer, remember that your dealer will become your unofficial partner in the vending machine business. A good dealer will have a solid business record (dealers that have run vending machine companies are preferred), should be honest, and have a list of satisfied (and dissatisfied) customers you can call. A quality dealer will carry several lines of new equipment and have a service and refurbishment department for used equipment. Most quality dealers offer several levels of refurbished used equipment to help you best meet your needs. They usually have some type of financing available, as well. Shop your rates and terms, because vending machine equipment is very difficult to finance; ask your accountant for your best finance solution. The dealer’s service staff should be available by telephone for quick suggestions on repair. They should have delivery services. Generally, a quality dealer has the ability to help you with all facets of your vending machine business and should be able to guide your decisions in an unbiased way. Of course this all comes with a cost: most quality dealers will be slightly more expensive than their competitors.

Keep in mind, though, that you don’t want to be “penny wise and pound foolish,” as the old saying goes. The added initial cost of your vending machine equipment will be overcome by the added service you will receive, and avoiding one simple mistake can generate thousands of dollars in added income. Use your dealer as a source of information and capitalize on that information.

Vending Machine Business Equipment Valuation

The valuation of vending machine business equipment is based on several factors:

  1. Storage value
  2. Collector’s value
  3. Scrap value
  4. Parts value
  5. Operational value
  6. Market value


In trying to value vending machines, each of these valuations is significant.


1. Storage value
Vending machines in storage are generally considered liabilities, and they cost you money each month. Even if you store the vending machines in your garage, they’re taking space that could be used for something else (like your car), which leaves them a liability.


2. Collector’s value
If you have an extremely old vending machine, you might have a piece of equipment that is collectable. The most notable examples are rounded top soda machines. These vending machines were made in the 1950s, and are examples of the initial entry into the cold drink vending era. They were usually purchased by bottling companies and painted with a brand of soda (Coke, Pepsi, Crush, etc.). They were usually single-selection (one flavor) and operated with primitive coin acceptance. Snack vending machines are much the same; they were usually a mechanical vend process with primitive coin acceptance. To be valuable, they need to be working and in pristine condition. Few of these machines still exist; just because a vending  machine is old does not mean it is valuable.

Vending Machine Business for High-Tech Equipment


Technology and vending machines business go hand in hand, kind of like peanut butter and jelly. In the last few years the vending machine industry has seen an increased demand for high-tech products sold in the ultimate convenience format, namely, through the swipe of a credit card. Let’s take a look together at some of the wildest, most innovative products that are now available at your neighborhood vending machine.

iPods: Apple
From a company whose motto seems to be “out-tech everyone, including NASA” comes a vending machine that sells just about every variation of an iPod available, from Nano to Shuffle, along with a slew of other Apple-centric products like iPhone covers and iPad chargers. 

25 Cent Vending Machines

Vending machine come in different sizes and forms as do the products the customers can purchase from them. Most electrically-operated vending machines can accept both coins and bills and then there are vending machines that only accept a specific coin denomination and reject the rest.
 
One of the most common problems one faces when dealing with vending machines is jamming. It is either the customer inserted the wrong coin or the bill is crumpled but ultimately, the customer loses money and does not get the product he or she wanted to buy. It also means that as an operator, you need to get the vending machine serviced to remove the coin or bill stuck in there.

Simply put, it is bad for business as the vending machine remains unavailable while something is lodged in the very mechanism that actually allows you to earn. This is a loss-loss situation for both the customer and the owner that should be avoided as much as possible.

In the bulk candy vending machine realm, the quarter vending machines reign supreme. They have become sort of de facto in this particular niche of the vending industry. Gum balls can be sold at 25 cents apiece and the vending machines can be calibrated to dispense the appropriate number of candies for the same amount.

Keep Your Vending Machines Safe

When starting an independent vending machine business, you have to invest a lot of money, time and hard work into your machines so it makes sense that you would be concerned about the safety of your vending machines. You do not want to be robbed of your product or your money.
Are your vending machines safe to the people that use them? Modern vending machines have been tested for their safety and they typically do not cause any injury to anyone who uses them responsibly. The only times that people have been known to be injured by a vending machine was usually while trying to rob from it.
On some rare cases when the vending machine failed to operate properly (steals someone’s money, dispenses wrong product, etc.) people have been injured from venting their frustration on them. People have been crushed when machines tipped over on them and some people have had broken bones or injured fingers from trying to get sodas from vending machines or candy bars that were lodged in.
A large and fully loaded soda machine can weigh over 1,000 pounds and while they are built to not tip over easily, if someone does manage to get them knocked over, they can be very dangerous. Part of your responsibility will be to keep a close check on your machines for malfunctions. You might also want to include a number on the machine that people can call to report malfunctions since this is what leads to many people getting upset with the vending machines and thus resulting in injuries to the consumer.

Vending Machines in Schools

Have you ever considered putting your vending machines in schools? While this is a fairly new phenomenon, it is becoming more and more popular. High schools and college campuses are the most common places to find various vending machines.
In the United States, vending machines are not as common in elementary schools although in some areas they have them as well. In colleges and universities that are not funded by public taxes, the rules are sometimes a bit different regarding contracts with vending machine companies and bottlers’ and competitors. You will have to check with your area to find out all the facts.

Interesting Vending Machine Types

Vending machines have come a long way over the years and you will be amazed at some of the options that are now available. It is also possible to customize your own vending machines and get a bit creative with what you put inside them.
If the traditional soda and gumball machine is boring to you, go ahead and consider some of the many other interesting vending machine types out there. Or maybe you want to try a little of both and see what is more successful for you. Just keep in mind that sometimes the most important thing is not what is in the vending machine but where the vending  machine is located.

Avoiding Vending Machine Business Scams

If you want to run a vending machine business, you might have heard stories of how you can make incredible amounts of money with very little work involved. And it makes sense when you think about how many people use a vending machine each day and how much money must go into the machines. However, if you are considering starting a vending machine business, you need to be cautious of common vending machine scams.

The Costs Of Starting A Vending Machine Business

If you are looking to start your own vending machine business, you might be wondering how much this is going to cost you. What seems like a simple process that leads to big income might be more expensive than you think initially. You will have to buy the machines, buy the product and in some cases you might even need to hire help to get the machines to their locations.
There are also other basic business expenses that you will have with any type of business that you start and it’s just the same with a vending machine business.

Plan Your Vending Machine Business


You need to have a realistic idea of your goals in mind first so that you know whether a vending machine business is really for you or not. Many people fall prey to the many scams out there and they think that buying into a vending machine business is a quick and easy way to make a lot of money. The truth is that many of these places exaggerate and some of them are just outright scam artists.

What Type Is The Best Machine To Get

When deciding to run a vending machine business, one of your most important decisions is going to be what type of vending machines to get and what to put in them. There are many different options out there such as snack machines, gumball machines, soda machines and more. The decision of what type to use will also partly depend on where your vending machines are going to be located and your target customer market for them.
This question you need to answer when starting a vending machine business. Do you need to buy some machines? You need to know how to choose a snack vending machine and what type is the best for you and your business?

Maintaining Your Vending Machines

When you have your own vending machine business, you know that the hardest part is usually getting started.
You have to plan the business, buy the vending machines, buy the product, stock the vending machines and even find places to put the vending machines. Its hard work and you will feel very happy when you finally have your vending machines in place and being used by the public.
However, it doesn’t stop there. You aren’t finished with your work as an independent vending machine business owner. While you’d probably like to just sit back and watch as the money pours in, there are still responsibilities that need to be taken care of to keep your business going smoothly and being profitable.

Social Vending Machines From Pepsi

I bet you thought buying a drink from a vending machine was one of the last untouched-by-technology things you could do. Well, Pepsi is out to change that with its new Social Vending Machines. 

That's right, PepsiCo is trying to make drink-buying a "social" (in the "social media" sense of the word) experience. Pepsi's new Social Vending Machines, which debuted at this past week's National Automatic Merchandising Association's One Show in Chicago, feature touchscreen interfaces and the ability to "gift" a drink to a friend--or even a stranger, as a "random act of refreshment." Check it out: 

Negotiating Vending Machine Locations

The ability to negotiate for a vending machine location is perhaps one of the most valuable skills a small operator can have. Identifying and securing new locations is how you start and expand your business and maintain success.

How Can Compact Vending Machine Add Value to Your Business?

A Shift in Vending
As manufacturing and big business continues to be outsourced from America, operators face declines in the classical desirable vending machine locations.  Instead of adapting to these changes, often times it is decided to reduce routes, cutting smaller “less profitable” sites, which in the future may become a large portion of the available locations.  To adapt to this change, a paradigm shift must occur.  Operators must embrace technology, and the recognition that a compact, full feature machine can add a tremendous amount of value to a route.